A busy Bodacious rings in the New Year

IMG_2081

John Beaudet has had a lot going on in the past few months. The biggest news is that we decided to go ahead and get married January 1. You can see all the pictures and read the full story on my blog at this link.

Back in early December, John drove to West Palm Beach, Florida, to work at the PGA’s Web.com Tour Qualifying School. As he did for 17 years, Bodhi (as he’s called there) was creating the hand-drawn scoreboard for this tournament. This photo shows the Canadian champion with scoreboard in the background.

fritsch-847-khamar

Another of John’s big commitments is to his Appalachian Trail maintenance work. As a member of the all-volunteer Tennessee Eastman Hiking and Canoeing Club, Bo spent the past several months replacing the old Koonford Bridge with a new 66-foot bridge in the Laurel Fork Gorge, Carter County, Tennessee. At 54, he is one of the youngest of this group of dedicated and amazingly skilled workers. (photos by club member Kim Peters)

????????????????????? ?????????????????? DSC06211 DSC06398 DSC06457 ???????????????Back in late summer, John got his new puppy, naming her Ivy to correspond to The Laurel of Asheville, the magazine where I work. After we’d had her just one week, our bigger dog, Dukkha, accidentally broke her metacarpal bone and Ivy had to be in a cast for four weeks. She’s finally healed, growing stronger every day and made her first trek onto the AT recently.

Ivy's first day home, at 8 weeks old.

Ivy’s first day home, at 8 weeks old.

Bo holding Ivy at our vet during one of the splint-change visits, about 10 weeks.

Bo holding Ivy at our vet during one of the splint-change visits, about 10 weeks.

Ivy's first time on the Appalachian Trail, at about 18 weeks old.

Ivy’s first time on the Appalachian Trail at about 18 weeks old.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dukkha "protecting" Ivy now that she is well.

Dukkha “protecting” Ivy now that she is well.

IMG_2226And finally, the progress continues on Beaugarts, the addition John is building onto his existing house, in which the newlyweds will live together. Pictures tell the story here, and you can always call John to learn more details.

All for now,
frances


IMG_6369
IMG_6361IMG_6365IMG_6368IMG_6374IMG_6379IMG_6380IMG_6383IMG_6384IMG_2222

Posted in House construction, Ivy and Dukkha, Marriage, PGA Golf Tour, Trail Maintenance | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

House update and reflections on childhood

Snow has already come to Flag Pond, Tennessee, this year, and John has been working hard to get our new house under roof by winter. Right now, during our one-year anniversary week, he is in the process of integrating the old and new structures, as the new house is basically a larger two-story addition onto the existing cabin he built six years ago.

IMG_6345

Bo says his style reflects the way you would build a barn instead of the way typical houses are built today. For instance, the framing wood is 2X6, not 2X4, and he cut and nailed the frame together “by hand,” (not with a pneumatic hammer), using 6-inch ring-shank pole-barn nails, which are hard to come by these days. His neighbor brought over a small crane and helped John to set up the structure after he had built it by himself in pieces.

IMG_6349

John is always arriving in Asheville with the casual scrapes and bruises that accompany total immersion in a building project. He says you can’t get anything done in the physical world if you are preoccupied with the possibility of getting hurt. Evidently, he’s always had this philosophy.

I asked him recently to tell me a little about how he learned to do what he does. Being the youngest of five, John said the older siblings would take off and kind of “ditch” him. So he’d end up at some neighbor’s place watching and helping with a project of some sort, and that’s how a lot of his “making” and “building” skills got started.

His oldest brother, Art, recently shared the family picture below, which is precious to John, as all the photographs he had of his family burned in a fire in Arkansas. Art shared these reflections about John:

25191_1411655418995_1507360_n“As we know, in grammar school, it’s not cool to hang out with even the kids one grade below you. In the family photo below, I was about 19 or 20 years old, John about 9 or 10 (we’re 10 years apart). I was off to college when John was 9 years old. My younger brother [by one year], Al, got a gymnastics scholarship to Michigan State. John liked the gymnastics Al did, tried anything; we joked he was like a chimp.

John is at bottom left, behind him Al, then Mary, his dad and mom, and Art standing behind Eddie.

John is at bottom left, behind him Al, then Mary, his dad and mom, and Art standing behind Eddie.

kokomosillo“From that, some of his nicknames: Johnny Bump (always some kind of bump somewhere from trying some acrobatic move), shortened to Bump, or Bumpus, or J.Fred Bump, a takeoff on the chimp that was on the Today show, J.Fred Muggs. He was always into nature, catching frogs, snakes, etc., as much as you could be in Houston, but that bloomed when he went to college, forestry school in east Texas.

“I told John some stories about my trekking in Nepal. I took four month-long trips to Nepal in ’73 & ’74, and hiked in the Himalayas, never high enough to be on snow or glaciers, not over 11,000 feet in altitude, but to a week’s walking from the nearest road. I also told him how in India and Nepal, they’d say to me: “Oh, you’re from USA! Mighty rivers, huge tall trees,” which made me think that to “be in the wilderness,” you didn’t have to go halfway around the world; there are plenty of spectacular natural beauty spots here. Maybe as a result of those conversations, I haven’t ever heard John talk about wanting to explore outside of the US.”

Thanks, Art, and thank you, Bodacious!
More photos of the house below, and more to come soon. ~frances

IMG_6348IMG_6347IMG_6343IMG_6342IMG_6341IMG_6340IMG_6339IMG_6338IMG_6344IMG_6346

Posted in Family, House construction | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Beaugart’s Begins

Yesterday (July 15) was John’s birthday and, for those who know him, it’ll come as no surprise that he spent it working on our new house, which we’ve dubbed Beaugart’s (a combination of our two names). In fact, quite a bit has happened on this project over the past month and a half. Every picture tells a story, and so here is a visual taste of what’s been going on.

May 28, groundbreaking; site excavation

What the site looked like just before excavation.

What the site looked like just before excavation.

IMG_1423

Ground breaking.

Ground breaking.

View of work from the lily pond.

View of work from the lily pond.

John worked right with the back hoe to pull out rocks for landscaping later.

John worked right with the back hoe to pull out rocks for landscaping later.

In fact, we excavated some really BIG rocks!

In fact, we excavated some really BIG rocks!

IMG_1503

Measuring to make sure the foundation is level.

Measuring to make sure the foundation is level.

IMG_1542

June 20, we got our concrete cinder blocks

IMG_1641

IMG_3830

June 21, we got our framing lumber. Thanks for helping, Randall!

IMG_3843

IMG_1680

June 27, the tubing was laid for in-slab heating/cooling. Thanks for helping, Tom!

Photo by Warren Lynn

Photo by Warren Lynn

June 30, the concrete was poured

Due to heavy rain the previous day, the trucks had trouble getting up to the site.

Due to heavy rain the previous day, the trucks had trouble getting up to the site.

But thanks to help from a team of heroic men, the pour was a success!

But thanks to help from a team of heroic men, the pour was a success!

Helping John out were three of his Appalachian Trail maintenance buddies.

Helping John out were three of his Appalachian Trail maintenance buddies.

Just Jim, Lumpy, Bob Peoples and Bodacious hard at work.

Just Jim, Lumpy, Bob Peoples and Bodacious hard at work.

All the guys got really dirty and chewed up by the concrete.

All the guys got really dirty and chewed up by the concrete.

Oh, and it rained.

Oh, and it rained.

IMG_1846

What the slab looked like the morning after the pour.

What the slab looked like the morning after the pour.

Now John is working on preparations for placing the cinder block. We will keep you posted.

Posted in House construction | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Pennsylvania trip to AT Museum

We just returned from a great weekend trip to attend the Appalachian Trail Museum’s Hall of Fame banquet.

10356348_10202201014290001_574357001204606465_nAlthough John has made the walking sticks for the Hall of Fame’s inductees since its inception in 2011 – and helped lug some ancient equipment out of the old grist mill that became the museum – he had never made the trek up for the actual event.

Everyone was thrilled to see John in attendance and, much to his complete surprise, he was recognized with a beautiful certificate and warm applause for his artistic efforts over the years.

It’s true that John lives without electricity and sans computer, but he asked that I help him create a site where he could show his work, as well as photos of his beloved AT (coming soon!). We both hope you enjoy this new site.

~frances and john

John, Frances and Dukkha at the AT Museum.

John, Frances and Dukkha at the AT Museum.

The Appalachian Trail Museum is in a stone gristmill building that was part of the former Pine Grove Iron Works.

The Appalachian Trail Museum is in a stone gristmill building that was part of the former Pine Grove Iron Works.

Bodacious, the trail name that most people use for John, was asked to give a short presentation about how he creates the walking sticks.

Bodacious was asked to give a short presentation about how he creates the walking sticks.

Bodacious reunites with friends on the museum porch.

Bodacious reunites with friends on the museum porch.

Certificate honoring John's contributions.

Certificate honoring John’s contributions.


Posted in Appalachian Trail Museum | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment